Aaron Kerlin-Scott

Aaron Kerlin-Scott

Brand Design Trends for 2022

With attention spans getting shorter, it’s vital that your brand says everything you want it to say in a way that looks good. This year, we’re focusing on helping businesses ensure their brand identity is effective, modern and looks good. We’re starting off by looking at the brand design trends for 2022 to understand the direction we will be going with all our projects this year. 

Before we start, though, we need to ensure your logo is fit for purpose and fits the principles of good design. 

The principles of logo design

Versatility

This is the focal point of all our projects. Your logo must be identifiable from different scales. I should recognise it from a pen and be able to notice your brand from far away. It must also work in negative – that means whether it’s in black of white, I can still tell it’s you. 

Memorable

The best logos are memorable. Don’t be afraid of simplicity, because it’s this simplicity that will help people remember you. If it’s too complicated, then you’re giving people a harder job of recognising your brand. Think of your favourite brands. Nike is just a tick. Apple is an apple. McDonalds is just the letter M. There’s no need to reinvent the wheel, you just need to identify yourself in a new, but simple way. 

Appropriate

Your logo should be fit for purpose. For example, a funeral director should not rebrand using Comic Sans. 🤨 The intended audience is vitally important. If you’re aiming at the high-end, older person market, then you need to create something which is classic and luxury. If you’re creating a brand for your toy shop, then it needs to be colourful and playful. 

Complimentary

If you have a sleek, clean logo, then you should avoid a big, chunky font. They should work as well apart as they do together. You should also check the colours. Not only should they identify with the voice of your business (i.e. the colours definition matches your values) but the colours should work together in a timeless fashion. 

Modern

Some trends will come and go, but there are some trends – most we are covering – which we don’t feel are going away anytime soon. *Spoiler alert* The major corporations of this world are simplifying their logos. You know if it’s being adopted by the big companies, then it’s something you should consider too. 

Brand Design Trends for 2022

Minimalism

This trend has come and gone throughout the decades. You only need to look at Nike, Adidas or Apple to see that minimalistic logos were hugely popular. These days, companies like Uber, AirBnB, Burger King, Mastercard, Google and many more are rebranding and incorporating minimalism massively into their new identity. 

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Most importantly, simple logos are the easiest to remember. What they lack in detail, they more than make up for in their ability to be recalled. You don’t need to abandon any sort of personality. Remember the importance of colour in design. A simple shape and bright colours could be enough to give you the edge on your competitors. 

You will also find your logo is far more adaptable. Like we mentioned earlier, scalability is important and your minimalistic logo will be recognised even at the smallest of scales. 

Monochromatic Design

Okay, so it sort of ties into minimalism, but you won’t be surprised. One of the big trends this year will be branding with a single colour (or very slight differences in shade!). It’s already rife amongst large corporations. Think of how many brands just use black or white, or a very limited range of colour. Netflix is a great example. 

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The colour in your brand is important. It influences what people think about your business, before they even say hello to you or your colleagues. It’s a massive, massive deal. Coca Cola uses red. Everything else about its identity hinges on it. This year, you should consider the same. 

Negative Space

Your logo does not just rely on what you design, but the space around it. People view your logo as a box, even if you haven’t designed it like that. 

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The Amazon logo is a good example of what I mean. The arrow swooping underneath extends the size of the box that the entire logo takes up. It’s important that it doesn’t swoop too low, or else it would extend the “box” of the Amazon logo and you might not appreciate it so much. 

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A popular example of negative space in action is the FedEx logo. Notice the arrow that is created between the E & X. 

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The USA network logo also utilises negative space. As we approach a stage where more companies become minimalistic in their branding, the use of negative space will become extremely important to diversify and stand out with your own brand. 

Negative space in design is effectively the use of optical illusions to create beautiful branding. It’s vital that you assess not only your logo but the space around it. Does it make best use of its space?

Serif Fonts

Your logo should be appropriate in feeling. It doesn’t need to say a thousand words about your business. If you’re targeting a high-end luxury market, then you should create something that is elegant. It doesn’t need to cram a hundred different values, so people know who you are. The smaller details such as the deep colour or the serif font will do that for you. 

Ensure it is unusual enough to stand out. I realise that seems contradictory to the minimalistic trends we’ve described above, but don’t lose faith. The fight in designing your perfect logo is creating something special enough that is uncomplicated. It should not look generic. 

The magic is finding the balance. When you strike this balance, then you’ve finally created the perfect brand identity for your brand. 

Are you ready to rebrand?

In 2022, The Marketing Mate is focusing on helping small to medium sized businesses modernise their brand. We’re sharing our learning with you to be transparent about our design process. If you’d like to share your vision, we’ll help you tell your story in a way that matters to your audience. 

Aaron is the Creative Director of The Marketing Mate. His passion lies in minimalist design and delivering valuable content in the simplest way possible. 

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